Scientific journals

Background: An occlusive patch formulation containing 10% methyl salicylate and 3% l menthol was recently approved by the US Food and Drug Administration for the treatment of mild to moderate pain. Despite the widespread use of counterirritants, including methyl salicylate and menthol, for topical pain relief, published efficacy and safety data regarding the use of the agents alone or in combination are limited.

Abstract: https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/20171409/

Background: Pain is normally treated with oral nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory agents and opioids. These drugs are dangerous and are responsible for many hospitalizations and deaths. It is much safer to use topical preparations made from plants to treat pain, even severe pain. Topical preparations must contain compounds that penetrate the skin, inhibit pain receptors such as transient receptor potential cation channels and cyclooxygenase-2, to relieve pain. Inhibition of pain in the skin disrupts the pain cycle and avoids exposure of internal organs to large amounts of toxic compounds. Use of topical
pain relievers has the potential to save many lives, decrease medical costs and improve therapy.

Abstract: https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S2221169115303427

Background: The effects of peppermint oil and eucalyptus oil preparations on neurophysiological, psychological and experimental algesimetric parameters were investigated in 32 healthy subjects in a double-blind, placebo-controlled, randomized cross-over design. 

Abstract: https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/7954745/

Background: Many people with chronic LBP use complementary and alternative medicine (CAM), visit CAM practitioners, or both. Several herbal medicines have been purported for use in treating people with LBP. This is an update of a Cochrane Review first published in 2006.

Abstract: https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/26630428/

Background: Arnica montana has been widely used as a homeopathic remedy for the treatment of several inflammatory conditions in pain management and postoperative settings. This review gives an overview of the therapeutic use of Arnica montana in the above-mentioned fields also focusing on its mechanisms of action learned from animal models and in vitro studies.

Abstract: https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/25171757/

Background: Complementary and alternative medicines such as herbal medicines are not currently part of the conventional medical system. As the the popularity of and global market for herbal medicine grows among all age groups, with supporting scientific data and clinical trials, specific alternative treatments such as herbal medicine can be reclassified as a practice of conventional medicine. 

Abstract: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7918078/

Background: Hypericum perforatum L. (Hypericaceae), popularly called St. John's wort (SJW), has a rich historical background being one of the oldest used and most extensively investigated medicinal herbs. Many bioactivities and applications of SJW are listed in popular and in scientific literature, including antibacterial, antiviral, anti-inflammatory. In the last three decades many studies focused on the antidepressant activity of SJW extracts. However, several studies in recent years also described the antinociceptive and analgesic properties of SJW that validate the traditional uses of the plant in pain conditions.

Abstract: https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/28216196/